Book Review: “King Sejong the Great,” Joe Menosky

I’m abandoning this book at page 100 because I have plenty more books I’d like to read and not only is this book not that interesting, the editing makes it unbearable to read.

Not only are there multiple spelling errors and missed periods, the sentences don’t flow at all, leaving the reader to be jerked back-and-forth trying to simply understand what they’re reading. This also leads to quite a number of sentences that are not even proper sentences.

“His joints ached from yesterday’s all-day and all-night event. Which he hid as best he could. Lest any hint of discomfort let alone infirmity prompt a nagging lecture from the eunuch.” (The sentences should have been combined.)

“The face was a mask of carved wood–staring eyes, gaping mouth, rosy cheeks–worn by a female shaman–a Mudang. As she gyrated in a small spiral across the dirt floor, reciting an off-kilter chant. As Sejong’s eyes…” (“As she gyrated” has no follow-up action.)

I worried that this would be a self-serving book, something hastily written and produced for an audience that would hopefully overlook the editing mistakes for the lackluster imagined story of King Sejong, and unfortunately, I seem to have been right.

Kpop Music Monday #33: Red Velvet, “Psycho”

Another girl group that epitomizes the “girl crush” concept is Red Velvet. Red Velvet is a hit both with Korean and international audiences–once when I was playing a Kpop channel at work, someone squealed, “Oh my god, it’s Red Velvet–I love them!”

Red Velvet takes risks as a group, notably with fashion, but also in music, shying away from the softer melodies and more “manufactured” sounds and styles of other groups. They all have killer pipes and there is no lead vocal within the group because they’re all just that good. (Check out those high notes!)

Member Wendy had an unfortunate accident during a rehearsal back in December of 2019 and broke her pelvis among other injuries she sustained. She was only able to return to the stage in late August of 2020. Apparently, a set of steps were not where they should have been, and she fell off of the platform.

I chose “Psycho” simply because it’s their best work–a little dark, a little edgy, but with all the lace and sparkling diamonds that their entertainment company could afford. I will give “Peek-a-Boo” an honorable mention because who doesn’t love a tortured pizza delivery man in their Kpop videos?

Book Review: “If I Had Your Face,” Frances Cha

“I would live your life so much better than you, if I had your face.”

Nestled in the beginning of this debut novel is the line from which the title was drawn, and it asks some impossible questions from its characters.

The first time I started reading this, I couldn’t tell the characters apart, and every time I started to figure out just who was talking, the chapter (and perspective) would change. It took me living in Korea for almost a year for things to click. This book is doing very well on the market, so I’m not sure if this initial unfamiliarity with the culture was a hindrance to others, or just me.

There’s a lot, living here in Korea, that is accurately represented in the book. My facebook feed is filled with sponsored ads for discount tummy tucks and facial botox. The pressure to look a certain way, have a certain face, seems embedded in the younger culture to the point where a kindergarten student of mine had his mom ask us to remove his glasses and apply double eyelid tape before any yearbook pictures were taken. He’s 7.

So for these girls, going through what they’re going through in the book… Yeah, it’s definitely believable. You can feel it, even if you can’t fully understand their intentions. It can be a bit jarring, bouncing back and forth between perspectives, but Cha manages to pull it off rather effortlessly (or so the reader thinks; us writers know better).

One of my favorite lines in the novel is: “But she makes a lot of money and saves a lot of it too, unlike other room salon girls apparently—or anyone our age for that matter—and it’s hard not to respect her for that. Kyuri doesn’t drink Starbucks.” Ouch. I felt that.

All in all, Cha is an extremely promising writer who has managed to take the lives of several Korean women and paint them with all their imperfections and flaws. My only qualm about the novel is how it ended with loose threads–I wanted something more. One can say that’s almost part of the point: that these individual women are still in the midst of living their lives and we know no more than they do what the next day will hold, but I wonder what the stories could have been if it had, instead, been individual short stories that were interwoven, rather than a novel. (A la “Winesburg, Ohio.”) I look forward to seeing what else Cha has up her sleeve.

If I Had Your Face: Auditioning for My Own Novel’s Audiobook

Kpop Music Monday #32: Hyuna, “I’m Not Cool”

The soloist Hyuna debuted back in 2006 with a short stint in the Wonder Girls before moving to the girl-crush group 4Minute, which sadly disbanded back in 2016. Her solo tracks have been really popular and she hasn’t shied away from expressing her sexuality and showing off her body, something that has scandalized the more conservative Korean culture.

In 2018, however, she went on to scandalize even further: admitting to being in a two-year relationship with E’Dawn, a boy-group member (Pentagon) and her co-member in the trio Triple H. Her entertainment company was none too pleased and both members were basically forced to leave the company.

“I’m Not Cool” is her first extended play with her new label, P Nation, headed by none other than Psy. (You know, the Gangnam Style guy.) In the song, she sings, “I love early mornings, Dawn, Dawn, Dawn; I’m not solo, that’s the way I like it,” clearly referencing her now-renamed partner who also signed with P Nation (and you can view his latest video here, and check out his “Bubble Pop Senorita” line, referencing one of Hyuna’s other solos from back in 2011).

We stan a confident queen who makes the best of what life hands her.