Medical Exam and Immigration: The First Steps

Last week the other new teacher and I went to the local hospital for our medical exam. In order to get an ARC (alien registration card), you must pass a medical exam.

the outside of a hospital, with a blue tent situated in front that you must enter before going into the hospital itself

Before we were allowed into the hospital, a nurse standing outside in a face mask, gloves, and a gown asked us if we had a cold and what the purpose of our visit was. They provided hand sanitizer for us to use and gave us a little sticker to wear.

First, we were taken into a room to have our height and weight measured. In that same room, we were told to cover one eye and read a few lines on an eye chart. We also were seen into a small soundproof booth and given a set of headphones, and told to raise our hands when we heard a beep. (I am hard-of-hearing in one ear so I was very familiar with this aspect of the exam.)

Then we were taken into a room with a doctor who asked us if we had any mental health problems, skin problems, and any other internal problems. While I waited for the other teacher to finish her consultation, the director of my school who had accompanied us to the hospital told me, with a clicking of his tongue, that the doctor doing the consulation was actually an OB-GYN who had found himself out of work in his field due to the low birth rate in Korea.

view inside the hospital; two open restrooms can be seen

We were then seen by a nurse who took a blood sample. I watched as this nurse drew one vial of blood and then proceeded to pour bits of it into other vials, all with her hands, and all without gloves. You could tell that she took hundreds of these samples a day, but I was still very worried for her safety.

Then she gave us an open paper cup and instructed us to pee in the cup. I noticed, for the first time since arriving in Korea, a squat toilet in addition to a Western-style toilet. There was no lid for our sample, and we opened up a little cupboard where a mirror would normally be in the restroom and sat the cup there. It was open on the other side so a nurse could reach in and retrieve the samples, but I was very surprised that they would just leave the cups open like that.

the inside of the changing room with blue tops and pink bottoms next to a set of numbered, lime green lockers with keys hanging from each

Next up was the chest x-ray. We were shown into a room and told to take off our shirts and bras and put on the open shirt provided. The other teacher and I were unsure of what to do so we also put on the provided pants, which proved unnecessary. The x-ray was super quick and we were back in our clothes.

Lastly was the dentist check-up. I swear, this dentist spent maybe thirty seconds looking at my teeth and pointing out that I have cavities and need to have a scaling procedure done. (Once my insurance kicks in, I plan on visiting a dentist that will take longer than thirty seconds looking at my teeth.)

Unfortunately, the other teacher has a shy bladder so even after we were finished with all the steps of the medical exam, we still had to wait on her to give a urine sample. Fortunately, I had purchased a 2 litre bottle of water before leaving our apartment, so she was able to down the vast majority of that to assist her. I also helped by playing her a video of a waterfall on my phone, and the director distracted her by telling her the story of another teacher who was so afraid of needles that he passed out while they were drawing blood.

A week later, we went to pick up our medical exam results which we were embossed and sealed in an envelope. The next day, we went to the immigration office, which provided hand sanitizer and a quick thermometer check before we were allowed to enter. We had to give fingerprints there and then went to Burger King afterwards, as one does.

the inside of a Burger King with no customers probably because it was 10:30 am

Even the director pointed out that he doesn’t understand why we must perform all aspects of the medical exam. I know they are testing for hard drugs, HIV, and tuberculosis, but is a dental exam really necessary? Is it possible to have one cavity too many and be turned away for improper brushing? I also have a lot of opinions about the full breadth of what they are testing for and how some of it is discriminatory but I’ll save that for another time.

My blood type is A, in case anyone is wondering.

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